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20121126
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what is at stake if partisans don't figure out a way soon. bush tax cut goes away and that alone would drive taxup fo. the patches will die as well. so add in the failure of the super committee and sequestered $1.2 trillion. spending cuts of $600 billion in defense. why are we here? you can't blame revenues. americans forked over $2.3 trillion in taxes and fees last year. the taxaholics are stone cold drunk on our spending. spending is out of control. mr. president, waiting for you to stand up and show leadership. bob, haven't heard a thing. crickets. >> eric: i think you heard things. there is movement going on here. >> bob: i'm glad they're breaking away from norquist and say there is a need for revenue. i think whether that comes in form of limiting deductions to $50,000 for people making over $250,000 or -- >> eric: i can say. we will get to all of that. we'll get to the deals that may go on. where is obama's deal or his idea? his proposed, i don't know. the medicare, medicaid, reform to get the tax cuts. >> bob: there will be form of entitlement of increasing the age of retirement
, clinton, and the first george bush, moved away from a position no additional taxes. they all added revenues to deficit reduction. a significant amount of revenue. >> your colleague from georgia just this week said the following about that pledge not to raise any taxes. >> you know, that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's valid now, but times have changed significantly.Ñi and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. >> it is my view that the issue of taxes is the number one stumbling block to any kind of fiscal deal. that has to be resolved first before you can get to issues like sequestration. when you hear that from a colleague, does it say to you that there is room, and does the president do anything short of raising tax rates on the wealthy? is there anything short of that acceptable? >> well, you've got to raise additional revenues, including tax rates on the wealthy. >> those have to go up? >> they have to go up. there's ways of doing that. secondly, though, we've got to close some significant loopholes. for instance, the ones which
an alternative minimum tax he had been talking about for the really wealthy. >> 30% or something. >> anybody from 1 to $10 million. also talked a little bit about raising the -- >> same thing he's been saying all along. >> he added that when it comes to who should be paying the higher taxes, he wants the threshold to be $500,000. >> and you see steven rattner on on talking about capital gains, deductions and things you've talked about a lot. >> time for the global markets report. ross westgate totally still confuse aed about thanksgiving and pilgrims. what was all the hoopla about? you celebrate boxing or something, don't you? like we lost a great boxer. is that what you celebrate? what is boxing day? >> boxing day, the day of a christmas. >> you wrap all your presents in boxes? >> i think it's something to do with all the presents. i'm not quite sure. >> yeah, put them in boxes. >> maybe. >> so you ignored our thanksgiving. but feeling okay again? >> yeah. you know, it's okay. it's all right. it's gone. now we can concentrate on the run up to christmas. and how much shopping we have to do. >> a
the economic recovery. obama's plan includes lower taxes on the first $250,000 earned by every american and tweaking the alternative minimum tax. the white house report estimates that consumer spending would fall by $200 million. now that's more than three times what consumers spent just over this entire holiday weekend. there could be a drag on a range of industries from cars and housing to restaurants and supermarkets, if congress can't reach a deal. and look, pocketbook issues are not the only problem here. carl levin, the democratic senator and chair of the armed services committee said automatic cuts to government spending could impact public safety. >> i think you should be worried if you have a defense job and we all ought to be worried whether we are dependent upon other aspects of the federal budget. whether we're worried about the regulation of our food safety, whether we're worried about our borders being secure, whether we're worried about fbi being supported, it's all affected by sequestration. >> joining me now, cnbc washington reporter eamon javers. you heard the numbers
't act, if the president doesn't act, in unison, your taxes are going up come january 1st to help raise revenue to pay down the national debt. stay with me here for a moment because we'll show you exactly, you know, how much your taxes will be rising. but here's the thing. it doesn't have to happen, this predetermined jump in income taxes and the new parlor game on capitol hill is to pick the next republican, follow me here who is willing to break a no tax pledge made to a very powerful lobbyist, in order to cut a deal with the democrats to focus the pain of new taxes on the wealthy. see this picture? see these three guys. here is yet another republican speaking just this morning. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. i made tennesseans aware i was just elected that the only thing i'm honoring is the oath that i take when i serve when i'm sworn in this january. >> so republican senator bob corker is saying his oath of office trumps any no tax pledge made to washington lobbyist grover nor quist. republican saxby chambliss says he cares more about america and the fiscal mess we're in than h
to avoid the tax increases and spending cuts due to kick in early next year. susan mcginness is in washington with all details this morning. good morning to you. >> talks are starting on capitol hill this week amid new signs republicans are willing to take a new look at an anti-tax pledge they made. president obama and congress begin negotiations this week to avoid the coming fiscal cliff. about $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and spending cuts that will kick in at year-end. both sides say they're looking for ways to compromise. >> that's what representative government should be about. no one gets all they want. if reagan and o'neill could do it, boehner and obama should be able to do it. >> reporter: but republicans have consistently voted against any deal that raises tax revenue. >> the key here is whether or not the republicans will move away from the ideologically rigid position which has been the grover/norquist pledge which most of them signed that they will not go for additional revenues. >> reporter: for the first time, even the anti-tax pledge appears to be negot
a break the no tax pledge. that is a hopeful sign, folks, because a new cnn/orc poll shows more than two thirds of americans believe a trip over that cliff would create major problems, perhaps even a crisis. cnn political editor paul steinhauser is live from washington, d.c. this morning. nice to see you, paul. so the fiscal cliff triggers back-breaking tax hikes and massive spending cuts. you've got more numbers that show what type of budget plan americans actually prefer. >> exactly. one of the big arguments, zoraida, is should it be all spending cuts to get us there or tax increases, as well? brand-new numbers just out from cnn/orc. only about one in three say whatever deal should be struck should be just spending cuts. but almost seven in ten, two thirds of americans say the plan should include spending cuts and tax increases. our poll indicates americans are not so optimistic a deal will get done and if it doesn't get done, who gets the blame? look at this right here, about 45% say republicans in congress will be blamed if there is no deal and the country falls off the fiscal cliff.
specifically, that's a series of tax increases and spending cuts together set to go into effect on new year's day if they cannot agree on a budget before then. president obama and congressional leaders have been talking and possibly to come this week. it's november 26th. they don't have a lot of time. peter doocy with the news from washington. >> harris, republicans and democrats alike think that closing loopholes to raise revenue is a good idea. republicans are resisting the idea that inleasing tax rates on the wealthy will steer the country away from the fiscal cliff even though suspects insist it will. >> i would be very much opposed to raising tax rates, but i believe that we can close a lot of lop holes. >> they have to go up, real or effective tax rates, there are ways of doing this and secondly, we have to gross loopholes. >> lindsey graham is okay with new revenue and willing to cap deductions to get it, but only if democrats agree to reform entitlements like social security and medicare. >> i don't expect the democrats to go for premium ouci do expect them to adjust these entitleme
not reach a deal your taxes could rise and sharp spending cuts would go into effect as well possibly triggering a recession. chuck todd is nbc's political director and chief white house correspondent. chuck, good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. >> the goal here is to get a deal that reduces the deficit, and the battle lines have been pretty clear right now. the president campaigned rolling back the tax breaks for the highest earnings and republicans argued spending cuts are the way to get the deficit under control. are we starting to see a softening of those positions on both sides? >> reporter: here's what there's agreement on. both sides, both parties agree that the wealthiest have to pay more, and the question now and the sticking point at this stage is how do you go about making the wealthiest pay more? do you do it by raising the tax rates? that's what president obama wants to do. wants to raise the tax freights 35% where they are now up to where they were during the clinton years at 39% what. republicans are arguing is you don't have to do that. you can get all of th
. if president obama and congress don't reach some sort of deal, huge tax increases and spending cuts would automatically kick in january 1. todayself republica selveral red away from a pledge banning tax increases. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece, and republicans should put revenue on the table. i want to cut rates to create jobs, but i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> i agree with saxby chambliss. a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. if i were in congress in 1941 i would have signed -- supported a declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to attack japan today. the world has changed. >> does it mean we might be closer to a fiscal cliff compromise? athena jones takes a closer look. >> reporter: that's, of course, the big question here. we know in the meeting the president had with lawmakers the friday before thanksgiving there was a lot of positive talk coming out of that with leaders
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10